The FL14 skiff "Redemption" on display at our local street fair in Monticello.

The FL14 skiff “Redemption” on display at our local street fair in Monticello.

14′ Skiff — The Redemption

 Over the summer we managed to finally put the finishing touches on the 14′ skiff, adding paint, varnish, and Chris’s custom nameplates (we call her Redemption). Joe has agreed to help out and refurbish the donated trailer so we can take her by Clinton Lake one last time on the way to delivering her to her new owner in Rock Falls. We are very proud of Chris for all the work he put into her and look forward to the day when Aaron and his kids finally get to do some fishing in her.
 
Prospector in the shop with the bow and stern decks installed

Prospector in the shop with the bow and stern decks installed

 

Rory’s 16′ Prospector Canoe

We have been very busy and have accomplished much on Rory’s canoe over the summer. While we had hoped to be done with it by June, knee surgery [Rory, get better, my man.] threw a wrench into our plans. The canoe has had two full coats of gloss varnish applied to the inside (complete with all of the sanding between coats) and a partial coat of the final matte varnish applied to the sheerline (the upper part of the hull). We wanted to do this before attaching the inwales (the small strips along the sheerline on the inside of the canoe).

We had quite a time machining the inwales correctly with the scuppers. Scuppers are small drainage openings in the inwales that allow the water to drain out of the canoe when it is turned upside down. Beside that practical function, I think they add a great detail and are very attractive. After ruining two strips of mahogany trying to cut out the scuppers on the router table, we finally developed a system that worked and ended up using soft maple for our inwales, installing them with slow-set epoxy over the past week. Next up: the outwales (outside strips that match the inside inwales), the thwart (cross brace at the center of the canoe), and the seats. Our outwales will be made from hard maple to withstand the dings and dents. 

Rory spent most of Saturday doing a caning demonstration on one of the seats for the canoe

Rory spent most of Saturday doing a caning demonstration on one of the seats for the canoe

The seats are built and caned by Chris and Rory. Yes, we caned these seats — there’s nothing like the old-time look and feel of caned seats for this kind of canoe. It will look so sharp when it’s done!

She was welcomed by rave reviews up on the square for the Monticellobration street fair in Monticello, IL, on Saturday, Sept. 19!